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Tag: concussion

We are growing again!

Added on August 4, 2016 by BodycentralPT

We are growing again!
It's back to school time for everyone and soon we will all be in full-swing "work" mode. Summer vacation is coming to an end. All summer long we have been working diligently on improving and expanding our services and footprint in Tucson!
 
On August 22nd, we will open our 5th location- The Bodycentral Physical Therapy Sports & Concussion Center.
 
This facility in Marana- 3601 W Cortaro Farms Road will be a great addition to our practice. If you have been to the Ultimate Sports Asylum location, then you have an idea of what this facility will be like. It is an open floor plan with high ceilings- equipped like a professional sports facility with rubberized flooring and a turf area for running, jumping, agility drills....well, you name it.
 
This location also has private treatment rooms and it features a concussion rehabilitation center. This specialized area will be used for our concussion evaluations and treatment programs that need a special environment. The decor in this facility is pretty amazing as well...I don't want to give away all the details because I want you to come for the open house party. Let's just say it will be pretty cool.
 
We are excited to be able to better serve our Marana and Northwest Tucson patients - and I'm sure you will be happy to have us closer to you to save the driving time!
 
Stay tuned for more updates.
 
Dr. Tonya Bunner (Co-Founder/CFO) and I want to say a heartfelt "Thank you" to all of our past and current patients- it is because of you that we do what we do. Also thank you to the medical community that has supported us over the years. We are blessed to be a part of Tucson and this great southern Arizona region.
 
Jennifer
 
Jennifer Allen,PT,DPT,OCS,SCS,CHT
Co-Founder/COO Bodycentral Physical Therapy
 
 

 

 

COMMON SOCCER INJURIES AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES

Added on March 28, 2015 by DrJAllen

COMMON SOCCER INJURIES AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES

COMMON SOCCER INJURIES AND PREVENTION STRATEGIES

Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world, and is becoming more and more popular in the United States. With close to 27 million players in the United States and Canada alone, understanding injuries in this sport is vital. FIFA (Federation Internationale Football Association) began tracking injuries to soccer players in 1998. Since then several other organizations have followed suit and have begun taking a look at how many and what types of injuries are most prevalent in the sport.

A study by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) suggests that in professional soccer, a 25-player team can expect close to two injuries per player during any one season. Researchers state 70% of those injuries are lower extremity in nature, 15% are head and neck injuries, 8% are in the trunk/spine, and 7% are in the arms/upper extremity. Out of these injuries, they state 80% are player to player contact in nature and the other 20% are non-contact injuries.

Common injuries seen in the lower extremities include: MCL (Medial Collateral Ligament) Knee injuries, Achilles tendon and Ankle Injuries. ACL injuries are also a concern and are a serious injury, but are not seen as frequently as the other injuries listed. Common injuries to the head and neck include concussions (1/3 of all head injuries), and sprains, strains of the spine. Groin injuries are one of the most common muscle injuries in the sport. Injuries in this area can be adductor muscle strains, pelvic instability, or sports hernias. This can be a challenging injury to deal with as a player as many of these injuries turn into chronic issues.

Sports Physical Therapy & Injury Prevention

Rehabilitation of injuries should focus on a global approach to treatment. If the injury is to the knee, Therapists need to focus on not only the function specifically of the knee, but also on the flexibility, strength, and neuromuscular control of the entire lower extremity. They must also make sure there is stability in what we traditionally refer to as the "core", which includes the abdominals, spine, and pelvis. Treatment should include Biomechanical Analysis of the lower body, and can include video analysis of movement, which helps identify break down in mechanics which can result in re-injury.

Concussion return to play is a staged program aimed at returning the player safely to play as they progress through a series of stages. These include full rest, working on aerobic capacity, strength, and progression to sport specific play, returning to non contact activity, and then resuming full sport activity. Based on current recommendations, this process should be a minimum of seven days. At any of the stages, if symptoms return, the player does not progress to the next level.

Injury Prevention techniques involve many approaches:

-       FIFA has instituted the FIFA 11+ Injury Prevention Program that includes a warm-up, preventative exercises, balance and agility exercises

-       Dynamic Warm Ups- These are active warm ups aimed at getting the body ready for activity. We no longer advocate jogging, then doing passive stretching before an event. Dynamic warm ups improve performance as well as decrease injury rates

-       Biomechanical Analysis and Player Specific interventions- each individual player is different, and each player has weaknesses, tightness and biomechanical problems that may dispose him or her to injury. Using video analysis and functional screening tools, Therapists can identify areas of potential injury and intervene with a custom program for the individual player.

-       The medical profession has begun to gather helpful information in the area of concussion and is identifying risk factors for concussion. At this time, we are developing concussion prevention activities based on the most current research, which includes core strengthening, postural control retraining, and specific cervical spine strengthening.

References:

Ekstrand J, Hagglund M, Walden M. Epidemiology of muscle injuries in professional football (soccer). Am Journal Sport Med. 2011;39:1226-32.

Jones N. Update: Soccer injury and prevention, concussion, and chronic groin pain. Current Sports Medicine Reports. 2014: 319-325.

Dr. Jennifer Allen is a Physical Therapist, Board Certified Clinical Specialist in the Areas of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, as well as a Certified Hand Therapist. Sports Programming at Bodycentral Physical Therapy includes Biomechanics assessment, video movement assessment, Injury Prevention, and individual and team performance enhancement. For more information visit www.BodycentralPT.netor call 520-325-4002.

 

 

Martial Arts Injuries- Causes, Treatment, & Prevention

Added on October 27, 2014 by DrJAllen


Participation in combat sports and martial arts is on the rise. People of all ages, and all conditioning levels are raising their fitness levels along with fighters. As with any sport, there are risks for injury. In Martial Arts, there are injuries that are seen more frequently. Following is a list of common injuries, some treatment recommendations for each, and ideas to avoid injury in the first place.


Neck, Spine, and Jaw Injuries
Sprains and strains are common in more contact type martial arts. Simple strains and sprains left unaddressed may lead to headache problems as well as chronic neck or spine issues. It's recommended to use ice or cold packs for relief in the first 72 hrs and to stay as active as you can. Bed rest is no longer recommended for spine problems, in fact the opposite is true. The sooner back and neck issues are treated with hands-on manual therapy and exercise, the better the chance of a full recovery. Seek treatment from a Physical Therapist that specializes in treatment of the spine.


Knee and Leg Injuries
Kicking is a staple in martial arts, and grappling requires being in positions on the mat that put strain on the knees. With these repetitive activities, there is a chance for Tendonitis (an inflammation of the tendon that connects muscle to bone), and for sprains of the ligaments of the knee (tissues that hold bones together in the joint). Simple muscle pulls are common and should resolve in a few days with rest from the aggravating activity. Tendonitis and sprains may present longer term problems and medical attention for these injuries is important. In the initial stages of injury, ice or a cold pack should be used for the first 72 hrs. Visit a Physical Therapist to screen the injury and give you exercises to get you back on track. With some injuries to the knee, swelling can develop inside the joint, which acts to "short-circuit" or "turn off" the big Quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh. In this situation, even simple walking may be very painful and the knee can "buckle" or give way. So, it's important to seek expert advice--don't just rely on exercises from the internet that might not be appropriate for the specific injury.


Hand and Arm Injuries
Punching and grappling can cause injury to the hand and upper extremity. The small joints of the fingers can be injured with repeated punching and with improper technique. These injuries are generally traumatic in nature and occur with one punch or with taking a kick to the hand. Small fractures or breaks in the bone can be present. Hand injuries should be taken seriously and may require x-rays to rule out significant damage. Injuries to the small joints of the hand can take a long time to recover. Joints in the knuckles can be swollen and stiff for several months after an injury has healed.


Concussion
Head injuries, or concussions can happen with a hard blow to the head, or from hitting the head hard on the mat. Symptoms include nausea, dizziness, and headache. Concussions may affect memory and concentration, and the athlete may feel as if he or she is "in a fog". Concussions are "functional" injuries to the brain and will not show up in an MRI or CT Scan. With any head injury, it is important to be screened by a medical professional. Mild concussions may resolve in as little as 7 days, but it is recommended to have a graded return to activity. No one should return to full activity until cleared by the medical team.


Bumps, Cuts, and Bruises
As with any contact sport, cuts, bumps, and bruises are just a part of the game. Knowing what to do about it is an important part of participating in the sport. A general rule for cuts is anything into the border of the lip or in the eyelid needs immediate attention and stitches. Cuts other places that are more than an inch long, or the sides of the skin don't hold together may also need stitches. When in doubt- get it checked out.


Ankle Sprains
An ankle sprain or injury to the ligaments of the ankle seems like a small injury. The problem is, if left untreated, athletes that sustain one ankle sprain are more likely to have another in the future. Getting treatment aimed at increasing motion, decreasing swelling, improving strength and balance are important to prevent re-injury. Wearing a brace is also helpful in preventing the recurrence of ankle sprains.


Strength, Flexibility, and Conditioning for Martial Arts- Injury Prevention
Flexibility and the ability to move through functional movement patterns like squatting, kneeling, standing on one leg, and others is an important baseline for any sport. If movement patterns are restricted by tight muscles or joints, there is a higher risk of injury. A base of strength and stability of the "core" is also important for injury prevention. Prior to beginning any sport, seek the advice of a Sports Physical Therapist to make sure movement patterns and joint function are adequate for the demands of the sport. If there are limitations, exercises and some hands-on treatment can be useful in getting the body ready for the specific sport. An ounce of prevention is worth weeks or even months of rehabilitation.

WAR is the Warrior Athlete Rehabilitation Program at Bodycentral Physical Therapy & The Ultimate Sports Asylum. This program addresses combat sports injuries, and focuses on returning the fighting athlete back to competition with the flexibility, strength, and stability needed for this demanding sport. For more information visit http://www.BodycentralPT.net Call (520)325-4002 to schedule your appointment.

 

Martial Arts Injuries- Causes, Treatment, & Prevention

Added on October 27, 2014 by DrJAllen

Martial Arts Injuries- Causes, Treatment, & Prevention


Participation in combat sports and martial arts is on the rise. People of all ages, and all conditioning levels are raising their fitness levels along with fighters. As with any sport, there are risks for injury. In Martial Arts, there are injuries that are seen more frequently. Following is a list of common injuries, some treatment recommendations for each, and ideas to avoid injury in the first place.


Neck, Spine, and Jaw Injuries
Sprains and strains are common in more contact type martial arts. Simple strains and sprains left unaddressed may lead to headache problems as well as chronic neck or spine issues. It's recommended to use ice or cold packs for relief in the first 72 hrs and to stay as active as you can. Bed rest is no longer recommended for spine problems, in fact the opposite is true. The sooner back and neck issues are treated with hands-on manual therapy and exercise, the better the chance of a full recovery. Seek treatment from a Physical Therapist that specializes in treatment of the spine.


Knee and Leg Injuries
Kicking is a staple in martial arts, and grappling requires being in positions on the mat that put strain on the knees. With these repetitive activities, there is a chance for Tendonitis (an inflammation of the tendon that connects muscle to bone), and for sprains of the ligaments of the knee (tissues that hold bones together in the joint). Simple muscle pulls are common and should resolve in a few days with rest from the aggravating activity. Tendonitis and sprains may present longer term problems and medical attention for these injuries is important. In the initial stages of injury, ice or a cold pack should be used for the first 72 hrs. Visit a Physical Therapist to screen the injury and give you exercises to get you back on track. With some injuries to the knee, swelling can develop inside the joint, which acts to "short-circuit" or "turn off" the big Quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh. In this situation, even simple walking may be very painful and the knee can "buckle" or give way. So, it's important to seek expert advice--don't just rely on exercises from the internet that might not be appropriate for the specific injury.


Hand and Arm Injuries
Punching and grappling can cause injury to the hand and upper extremity. The small joints of the fingers can be injured with repeated punching and with improper technique. These injuries are generally traumatic in nature and occur with one punch or with taking a kick to the hand. Small fractures or breaks in the bone can be present. Hand injuries should be taken seriously and may require x-rays to rule out significant damage. Injuries to the small joints of the hand can take a long time to recover. Joints in the knuckles can be swollen and stiff for several months after an injury has healed.


Concussion
Head injuries, or concussions can happen with a hard blow to the head, or from hitting the head hard on the mat. Symptoms include nausea, dizziness, and headache. Concussions may affect memory and concentration, and the athlete may feel as if he or she is "in a fog". Concussions are "functional" injuries to the brain and will not show up in an MRI or CT Scan. With any head injury, it is important to be screened by a medical professional. Mild concussions may resolve in as little as 7 days, but it is recommended to have a graded return to activity. No one should return to full activity until cleared by the medical team.


Bumps, Cuts, and Bruises
As with any contact sport, cuts, bumps, and bruises are just a part of the game. Knowing what to do about it is an important part of participating in the sport. A general rule for cuts is anything into the border of the lip or in the eyelid needs immediate attention and stitches. Cuts other places that are more than an inch long, or the sides of the skin don't hold together may also need stitches. When in doubt- get it checked out.


Ankle Sprains
An ankle sprain or injury to the ligaments of the ankle seems like a small injury. The problem is, if left untreated, athletes that sustain one ankle sprain are more likely to have another in the future. Getting treatment aimed at increasing motion, decreasing swelling, improving strength and balance are important to prevent re-injury. Wearing a brace is also helpful in preventing the recurrence of ankle sprains.


Strength, Flexibility, and Conditioning for Martial Arts- Injury Prevention
Flexibility and the ability to move through functional movement patterns like squatting, kneeling, standing on one leg, and others is an important baseline for any sport. If movement patterns are restricted by tight muscles or joints, there is a higher risk of injury. A base of strength and stability of the "core" is also important for injury prevention. Prior to beginning any sport, seek the advice of a Sports Physical Therapist to make sure movement patterns and joint function are adequate for the demands of the sport. If there are limitations, exercises and some hands-on treatment can be useful in getting the body ready for the specific sport. An ounce of prevention is worth weeks or even months of rehabilitation.

WAR is the Warrior Athlete Rehabilitation Program at Bodycentral Physical Therapy & The Ultimate Sports Asylum. This program addresses combat sports injuries, and focuses on returning the fighting athlete back to competition with the flexibility, strength, and stability needed for this demanding sport. For more information visit http://www.BodycentralPT.net Call (520)325-4002 to schedule your appointment.

 

Female Athletes and Concussion

Added on October 22, 2014 by DrJAllen

With all the recent news coverage and sports medicine updates on Concussion management, it is becoming clearer to all of us that concussions are a serious concern to our athletes.

What is a concussion?

It is a traumatic brain injury that happens with a rapid motion of the head, or a direct blow to the skull. Some athlete's have described this as getting their bell "rung" or other similar descriptions. Athletes of all ages are at risk for concussions, and different sports have varying degrees of risk. Most people think of the NFL and football when we talk about concussions, but it doesn't stop there.

Why are female athletes more at risk?

There are some theories to explain why concussion rates for female athletes are higher than their male counterparts, but at the time of this writing there hasn't been any hard evidence to prove any of these.

Some possible reasons: 1) Female athletes may be better at reporting their symptoms and seeking help  2) Females have a smaller mass of the head and neck, making it more difficult to absorb the injury  3) Females may have less developed neck muscles, which may lead to less control of the head during impact

Preventing and Treating Concussions

Prevention is KEY. Talking to coaches, athletic trainers, parents, athletes, Physical Therapists and others about the importance of concussions and ways to prevent them. Some of these prevention strategies include wearing the right protective gear, playing by the league rules, and making sure athletes are conditioned properly for their chosen sport.

Recovering correctly from a concussion is serious business. Recovery generally includes a period of "shutting down"- both physically and mentally. Athletes must rest from academics and from athletics-- and that means no video games or cell phones too! The brain needs a period of rest. Following this, the athlete will slowly resume activities under proper guidance of a physician, athletic trainer and physical therapist team. The athlete should only return to activity when formally cleared by the team.

Avoiding re-injury is important too. Studies show that players who have one concussion have a greater chance of having another one. With repeated concussions athletes may experience memory loss and difficulty thinking and concentrating.

What's the Risk?

Soccer- research shows female soccer is second only to male football players for the number of concussions each year. Concussions can be caused by falls, player to player impact, and from heading the ball repeatedly.

Cheerleading- high level techniques like throwing cheerleaders high in the air have led to an increase in concussions in cheerleading

Basketball- player to player contact and hitting the head on the floor may cause concussion

Skiiing/Snowboarding- high speed falls and collisions are potential for concussions

Softball- player to player collisions, sliding, and being hit by a ball are potential for concussions

Volleyball- player to player impact, and being hit by the ball or hitting the head on the court are potential problems

Prevention Strategies at Bodycentral Physical Therapy and the Ultimate Sports Asylum

Because of the prevalence of the concussion problem in female athletes, we are teaming with experts in the field to develop concussion prevention strategies and programs for athletes of all ages. For more information on these programs, please contact Dr. Jennifer Allen at info@bodycentralpt.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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